Friday Heirloom 72: CAPC Musée d’art contemporain, Bordeaux

Friday Heirloom 72: CAPC Musée d’art contemporain, Bordeaux

Check out the Highlights of October here

I CAME, I SAW… I SELFIED!

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Cover Photo: Strolling through Paul Bonet’s artwork at the CAPC Musée d’art contemporain Bordeaux

One morning, while on my way to La Cité du Vin, I happened to walk by the CAPC (Centre of Contemporary Visual Arts) in Bordeaux. I had some time to kill, so I decided to enter…

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The stunning, ancient building hosting the CAPC Musée d’art contemporain’s collections

While reading the museum’s brochures, I learned that the space was created in 1973 and installed the year after in what is called Entrepôt Lainé, an old warehouse which over time has gone through quite a few changes.

In the cover photo of this article is the artist Paul Bonet, or, better, his precious drawings which are preparatory sketches of some of the most famous 1920s French book covers. Although I really liked the way the exhibit is organized, I had the most fun in the “mirror room” of the museum’s Hall (“La Nef”), pictured below.

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This is “Take My Breath Away”, which traps the viewer in a structure made of 23 mirrors engraved with the words of the song Fabulous Muscles by the band Xiu Xiu.

Sharing the same space is Danh Vo‘s site-specific sculpture installation made up of 30 monumental blocks, weighing between 1 and 21 tons, and created from Italian marble.

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Danh Vo’s installation took me back to my home country. Between a cathedral and a storage room, the hall pushes visitors to meditate and create their own version of the story. They are free, in silence, and it’s so fascinating. Some of the marble blocks are even used as surfaces for the show of photographs: hands, mostly, and very famous ones, like Mose’s, Christ’s or Michelangelo’s.

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Continuing my walk through the CAPC Musée d’art contemporain I entered the Pavillion, a residency of international creation carried by the BordeauX – EBABX School of Fine Arts. Here I was able to see the works of Anaïs Hay, Seunghee Choe and Laure Subreville. I loved the ocean screens (pictured below).

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Then I arrived upstairs, where I encountered the CAPC Musée d’art contemporain’s permanent artworks (1,299 to be precise, created by 189 artists), including acquisitions and purchases but also works on permanent loan from the Centre Pompidou, the FNAC (Fonds National d’Art Comtemporain), the Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations and also loans from the artists and collectors themselves.

All the works show the different stages of the creation of the museum, as well as the achievements of its different directors throughout time (click here if you want to learn more about the museum).

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Claude Rutault, Collection de 4 définitions/méthode n.68-1978

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Annette Messager, Plaisir-Déplaisir

While I was deciding it was time to leave, I came across the two exhibitions of the arc en rêve centre d’architecture: one devoted to the work of Chinese architects Wang Shu and Lu Wenyu, who, with their firm Amateur Architecture Studio in Hangzhou have shaped the future of Chinese architecture freeing themselves from traditionalism (for more information on the exhibit, here’s the link to the website).

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Herringbone bamboo pattern

The second one is titled terre d’ici, with the presentation of recent research on the earth as a building material (same: for more info check out the website).

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Overall, I was I was pleasantly surprised to see many and great exhibitions at the CAPC Musée d’art contemporain. Above all, this place has become an open window to the world – like most Bordeaux monuments and sites. Oh and if you are a member of La Cité du Vin, you get in for free! Are you ready to go?

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